Adios, Apple. I’m Leaving iOS for Android.

Today Apple announced the long-awaited successor(s) to the iPhone 5 with the 5S and 5C models. If you’ve been a follower of my work for any length of time, you know that normally this would be a day of joy for me. As a self-professed Apple Fanboy, I have purchased my fair share of iPhones over the past 5 years, and each one has been a little less cool than the one before it. I remember the original iPhone announcement in 2007. The buzz around that thing was enormous. I, like many of the sheep, couldn’t wait to get my hands on one. Even for the 3G and 3Gs models, I waited in line for hours just to be one of the first ones to hold that awesome device in my hands. However, as the releases kept coming, I kept noticing something. A trend was emerging that (sadly) has crept into every facet of Apple’s business. They were abandoning their core demographic and going after a new one. Therefore, I’m leaving iOS for Android.

When the iPhone first came out, it was a lot like a Mac back in the 80s and 90s. You were somebody if you had an iPhone. You were cool and trendy, while at the same time thumbing your nose at the business world who were clinging ever so desperately to their Blackberries and Treos. Nowadays, everyone has an iPhone, and I do mean EVERYONE. Apple knows this too, and so they’ve stopped trying to change the world and are seemingly happy to appease it. Adding family-friendly features like colors and camera specs doesn’t exactly appeal to the geeks that used to fawn all over your products, now does it? Nope.

So, Apple if this is the best you’ve got, I’m out. Let it be known that from this day forward I will no longer stand firm in the camp of iOS. Yes, it’s going to cost me a bunch of money to early upgrade my phone and repurchase all of my apps, but I don’t care. Android, here I come. Can Apple win me back? Well, from a phone perspective, I doubt it… but it’s not like I’m giving up my MacBook Pro or iPad anytime soon.

Justin Seeley is a graphic designer, author, and online content creator. His work can be seen on platforms such as LinkedIn Learning, Lynda.com, CreativeLIVE, and Pluralsight. Justin loves helping both individuals and businesses reach their professional goals through education, creative services, and social content strategy.

28 comments On Adios, Apple. I’m Leaving iOS for Android.

  • I am an android fan and literally sometimes I doubt why people use iPhone, its overpriced, over estimated and the only expensive product which copies others and still say its new.
    If you are comming to android, I want to warmly welcome you to an amazing world. By the way my recommendation is Samsung Galaxy S4 or Moto X if you really want to enjoy android smartphones.

  • I have been waiting patiently to upgrade my iPhone 4 and after watching the keynote through the eyes of cnet bloggers I admit that I am seriously thinking about switching. The Moto X looks very appealing but the whole app thing keeps pulling me back to iPhone. Perhaps I should just flip a coin, the hassle of switching or the same old of staying.

  • Wow.

    So you mention nothing of the new hardware involved, you’re still devoted to your ipad and macbook, and your only major beef is that it also comes in some new colors and it’s a popular device. You lament that the iphone has become “trendy cool”, as opposed to “geek cool”?

    Who’s the sheep here…?

    • You are, obviously. The hardware isn’t impressive at all to me. I don’t play games on my phone or rely on it to take amazing photographs. I do, however, expect it to integrate well with my digital life (gmail, google docs, etc.) which the iPhone does NOT. Yeah, I’m going to keep using my macbook and ipad because they’re aren’t any competitors out there that produce products I am interested in. When and if they pop up, we’ll see. If you were impressed yesterday, you are the sheep, seriously. Thanks for trolling!

      • You should have included more of that in your first entry. I don’t agree with you, but it’s more compelling reasoning than colors and losing a sense of exclusivity. I personally find that the iphone integrates well with the google cloud that I use, but I do most of my cloud file sharing with dropbox. But if a person is invested in google apps maybe android is a better fit for reasons that are pretty obvious.

  • I agree with all you’ve said Justin. I’ve been considering leaving my iPhone if the new one wasn’t the significant improvement I have come to expect from Apple. It isn’t. Samsung and others have slowly closed the gap while Apple coasts along-minus Steve Jobs type innovation. I just hope the lethargy we see in the iPhone segment doesn’t spread to other Apple devises. When I look at the tablet market, and competitors’ pricing strategies, I am not optimistic.

  • I was in the same boat several years ago. I worked for Apple and was a huge fan, but after seeing how they were treating their pro market, I decided to bail. While I do like their computers, I could not afford to buy an outdated and overpriced Mac Pro. I did have an iPhone 4s, but left that for the LG Optimus G and left my iPad for the Nexus 7. While I do appreciate some of the excellent designs produced by Apple, I don’t want to be locked in to a design by Apple. I don’t see the innovation I once saw with Apple and that is sad. However, they have educated the public on what a computer company can do to innovate. Maybe there is another Steve Jobs out there that can do the same.

  • Hey Justin
    I can do so much with my iPhone that I’m not sure I could do with an Android. I use Apple TV every day, and use my iPhone and the remote app for that and with my music on my iPhone I can send a
    Playlist to my Nuvo in-house music system using Apple’s AirPlay and the remote app on my iPhone (and control the volume of my ceiling speakers too!) Is there an alternative for all of that? I love my Apple products. Are there other companies/products that can do all of that with a phone?

  • I’d like to know what you think after you make the switch. The few people I know who switched to an Android device regretted it and eventually came back to the iPhone (within the last year). I can’t really speak about non-apple devices (last non-apple device was a Motorola Q), but I really enjoy the apple experience/ecosystem, i.e. being able to stream all my devices onto my living room TV with music, video, and pictures via Apple TV.

    I suppose I could switch, but then I would have to purchase multiple new products to create the same setup. This is a bit off topic, but It would be interesting to see a side by side comparison of an entire home setup between Apple devices and non-Apple devices.

    As an aside: Justin, I’m an admirer of your work. It’s quality stuff and I value your opinion 🙂

    • Thanks very much, I appreciate that. I love my Apple TV and I’ll always use an apple computer. My phone is just in a different category. I’m not getting what I want/need from Apple, and I think I’ll get it from Android. If not, I may come back into the Apple fold… Who knows!

  • Does it make calls? CHECK.
    Does it wake me in a morning? CHECK.
    Does it sit nicely in a standard pocket? CHECK

    Does it crash like an android? NO

    No brainer for me. Love my iPhone.

  • So what’s the Apple would do now in order to keep people like you on the line. I’d abandon using apple products if adobe start building apps for android like, adobe ideas etc

  • Been iphone fan since the first, but now im an android lover since jelly bean.

    Share from gallery to every apps? CHECKED

    download files from the internet? CHECKED

    big screen so no more squinting when browsing? CHECKED

    INFINITY battery on my s4? Battery kit yes, CHECKED

  • almost everyone has an android too you know lol

  • “Business models change. So must we as creatives.” That’s what you said about Adobe CC and it’s true about Apple. People who don’t like the CC can just jump ship, too!

    • Unfortunately, this is NOT the same thing. Apple has changed the market in which they’re going after, while Adobe simply has changed their pricing model. Adobe continues to innovate and provide me with tools that I want/need for my job, while Apple thinks I’ll be satisfied with pretty colors and moderately bumped camera specs. If you want to jump ship from Adobe, go ahead, but good luck finding tools in the same class as what they’re producing. I can easily find equivalents or in most cases better performing smart phones, but nothing can take the place of Creative Suite/Cloud in my workflow.

      • You’re right. I can’t jump ship rom Adobe. I work for a non-profit who buys the software we need. With today’s economy, we can’t afford to buy new software. Sometimes we get grants for tech stuff. We haven’t gotten one of those in a while.
        As for Apple and Android. I’ve had so many friends convert from Android to Apple. Most had multiple replacement Android phones within a year. I’ve had the same iPhone for almost 2 years now. I’m not excited about the new iPhone but I’ve never had a problem with my phone. I guess it’s all about money.

  • I have had a friend sell me on the Droid platform/phone and I am aware of it’s PRO’s. However I have been an Apple user and their biggest fan since 94′. It will be hard to switch. It’s these simple things that really prevent me from doing so. And I would appreciate your reply to these concerns. 1. I depend on my calendar to sync via icloud to my desktop – my schedule depends upon it. 2. Contacts syncing to my desktop is a must.

    • What people don’t realize is apples ecosystem is limited to apple products where is Google’s is universal because its apps are also integrated into gmail and gmail is the foundation for their entire ecosystem which can be used on any platform.

      I synced my galaxy s4 and nexus 7 to i calendar on my macbook pro no problem because it only requires an email and it all runs through gmail making Google calendar and iCal communicate flawlessly with each other.

      I’m not sure about address book but I think you can do the same.

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  • I’ve been using Android devices for quite some time now. All this talk about crashing and the negative aspects of Android is not what I’ve seen. In fact, I’m voice typing this post right now on my Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 with Jelly Bean 4.1.2. my wife had the Galaxy S Vibrant for 3 years. She’s dropped a countless times and is still worked with no problems. she just upgraded to the Galaxy s4. That phone is amazing. Just got my daughter the Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 7 inch and she is very happy with it. The price is right, she’s used to using my Note so it was the logical choice. The biggest setbacks for me on Apple iDevices are price, limited capability, and you are stuck with little option to customize. I have my devices at according to how each user on their devices want and I have a happy household.

  • for itunes and battery issues alone I am going to switch to Android. Apple used to be innovative but now they are just copying and/or suing other companies just to remain relevant. Their laptops/desktops are still awesome but those f-ing phones are paper weight. I am switching to a flip phone until my contract is up then its on to the galaxy note 4

  • I’m with you, lately I’ve really been disgruntled with the who apple ecosystem. I’ve loved apple for so long but for some time now I’ve finding the list of flaws getting longer.

    I”ve had an iPhone from the very first one, still have the very first iPod they made and many others of course. I have bought every apple devise except Mac Pro ( this desktop devise is way too expensive).

    The my iPhone 5S is so bad. Crashes daily. The calendar app is unusable. icloud sucks. What were they thinking? All style and no substance. The problem with apple is they don’t admit their mistakes and I’m not sure they can really innovate anymore because they are so in love with themselves.

    Having said that, it’s not easy to give up my iPhone. I just wish they would fix a few things and not go on thinking that everything they do is Magical.

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